Startups

The Role of Due Diligence 

Why is Due Diligence Necessary?

Due Diligence

“Due diligence is both an art and a science.” According to Investopedia, Due diligence is an investigation or audit of a potential investment or product to confirm all facts, that might include the review of financial records. Due diligence refers to the research done before entering into an agreement or a financial transaction with another party.

Because of the due diligence, your investors may come to a different or more nuanced understanding of the opportunity and seek to renegotiate the initially agreed terms or even decide to decline the investment.

Types of Due Diligence

Due Diligence

There are various types of due diligence given that every circumstance is different and there’s no formula for it. Mainly, there are four basic types of due diligence which include commercial, financial, tax and legal due diligence.

Commercial Due Diligence reports analyses company performance, the likelihood that the business will meet its targets, and highlights potential problems that may occur as a result of an acquisition. This report provides the potential buyer with in-depth knowledge of the target company and the market in which it is positioned. It is designed to enable the prospective buyer to make an informed decision, and highlight any potential risks associated with the target business.

Financial Due Diligence typically, the scope would include an analysis of the historical quality of earnings, quality of net assets, working capital requirements, capital expenditure requirements, financial debt and liabilities, and forecasted financial results. In short, it focuses solely on the financial health of the company.

Tax Due Diligence is a comprehensive examination of the different types of taxes that may be imposed upon a particular business, as well as the various taxing jurisdictions. To put it simply, it could be viewed as an extension of the financial due diligence, where the focus is on identifying potential additional tax liabilities arising from non-compliance or errors.

Legal Due Diligence covers a wide scope of legal matters, including proper incorporation and ownership, contractual obligations, ownership of assets, compliance, and litigation. It aims to confirm the validity of the rights being acquired by your investors and the absence of legal risks which could undermine the value of the investment.

How Long Does Due Diligence Take?

Duration

According to David Braun, CEO of a Capstone (they specialize in M&A) generally, on average due diligence should take between 30 and 60 days to complete. It is the optimal time to complete a thorough evaluation of the business without letting the process drag on. Why is this such a long process? Read on!

Due Diligence Process

Process

Before the Due Diligence, gather your internal and external team of lawyers, accountants, advisors, and investors. The internal and external team will come together to discuss an opportunity, and terms of investment. Key terms discussed are usually laid out in a non-binding document such as a Term Sheet or a Cap Table. These usually are discussed through a virtual data room whereby information is typically secured hence ensuring only approved viewers get to access the confidential documents. Virtual data rooms can be created virtually and many firms provide them. Datarooms.com, Drooms, etc. are just some of the few that provide safe due diligence with information like this. Need help in generating a Cap Table? Or don’t know what to include in your Term Sheet? We got you covered!

During the Due Diligence, there is a lot, when I say a lot, I meant a lot of information requesting and receiving. So be prepared for that! That aside, there will be on-site visits at the target business by the due diligence team. During the onsite visit, the due diligence team gets to interview with various management team members from various functions; they will discuss the findings as well as draft out a report on the findings. The report is then sent to your investors and further negotiation on changes to the term could take place. Overall, since it is not a one-man show; it involves various stakeholders and hence there is no doubt due diligence process is such a long process.

Conclusion

Process

To ensure a smooth due diligence process, I would advise every business to do a lot of research and do your own due diligence first, so you can answer all the questions raised by your internal and external team. Usually, a framework or checklist would come in handy when you want to do your own due diligence and they can be found here. It goes beyond the basic checks you would normally make and it’s safe to say that if you find it to be relatively straightforward, you probably didn’t do it right. On top of the checklist, follow this article on Due Diligence in 10 Easy Steps. Check out our article on What to include in an Investment Package, it will come in very handy when you do your own due diligence.

According to our experiences, some potential red flags that you should look out for when doing your own due diligence are and not limited to the following — Make sure your business’ contracts are fully disclosed, your business is not in the middle of any litigation case, and check the local laws to make sure there aren’t any violations. You should always try to overcome the red flags or the difficulties faced before the actual due diligence.

No matter what, always remember that due diligence is your best opportunity for investors to understand the risks involved in your business before signing a long term relationship hence, be prepared to do everything to minimize the risk. Are you a startup seeking funding during Seed or Series A? Check us out here!

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About VenturX

VenturX is a web platform that helps entrepreneurs through their journey from idea to launch and beyond. VenturX uses data-driven analytics to score and connect startups and investors at Seed and Series A financing.

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Top 10 Questions from Investors 

Top 10 Questions from Investors 

questions from investors

questions from investors

If you’re raising money for your company and wanting to pitch to angel investors and venture capitalists, then it is essential for you to know and expect what questions will be asked and how you should approach these questions. More often than not, they will ask you the same questions over and over again which will help determine why they should choose you. Make sure you are taking notes on the questions from investors so that you can score during future meetings.

For the past 2 years, VenturX has been actively participating in pitching to investors and of course, we have compiled the top 10 questions your investor will ask you and how you should approach these questions.

Top 10 Questions and How to Approach Them

Q&A

1) Where do you see the sales trend over the next 1–2 years?

This is an open-ended question. To approach this question, you must give a broad response and even touch on a variety of issues that could prove valuable to the investor’s decision-making process. The time frame will give the investor a good gauge of the opportunities as well as the risks involved over a short term. You need to provide as much proof that your answer is not full of just speculations (ie. we have 5 signed letters of intent for the next 4 months, we already have $100,000 in purchase orders that we just need to fulfill, etc.)

2) Who are the competitors in the industry?

The investors want to know who the potential competitors in the market and they expect you to know them in detail. They would also want to be alerted with any new products or services that may appear in the market which could impact your company. You should already have a concrete plan on how to deal with these competitors and focus on what makes you so special over them before your pitch.

“If an entrepreneur tells me that they don’t have ANY competitors, that is a red flag! They didn’t do their homework!” — Marvin Liao, Partner at 500 Startups, San Francisco. 

3) What obstacles are you currently facing?

No doubt every business is prone to failures and weaknesses, they are part of the equation of growth and they are often where all of the great learnings come from. The investors want to know what are the vulnerabilities in your company. However, keep in mind that identifying the problem is only answering part of the question. It is more vital to convince them how are you going to overcome these problems in both short and long term and convince the investors you have what it takes to overcome any potential obstacles.

4) How is your business performing?

Your investors are interested in how your business is performing. You should give them an introduction to Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and other non-financial metrics that are going to affect the company’s growth. For software companies like us, KPIs include the lifetime value of a customer, customer acquisition cost, and monthly recurring revenue. Whatever your key metric is, it’s usually unique to your specific business. For more info, check out one of my favourite books “Lean Analytics” — by Alistair Croll and Benjamin Yoskovitz

5) How do you track trends in your market?

Due to the nature of start-ups, especially tech-based start-ups, things change very quickly. Investors would like to know if you are aware of your industry, as well as how you find data to stay on top of industry trends. Before pitching, be prepared to share how you find data about your customers and industry, as well as how you can leverage this information to improve your business to stay on top of the game.

6) Can you tell me a story about a customer using your product?

This should not be a surprise as it should already be included in your pitch. According to our experiences, the best pitch usually is the ones that open with a story about how your products and services are helping customers. We would advise using real names to be as specific as possible to describe how your services have transformed your customers and get rid of their “pain.” Hence, be sure to craft an excellent story on your customer and let that tell a story for you!

7) How can I connect with some of your customers who have used your product or service?

If your investors ask this question, you are on the right track! They find your pitch interesting and begin what’s called the due diligence process. During due diligence, they want to know a lot more about your target market/customers. Some insights you should provide to your investors are: who they are, how you know who they are, how did you find them, what do they think about your product or service, how often are they using it, on what scale, how you interact with them, etc. This would be a good place to use metrics that we guide our startups with such as Conversion and Engagement.

8) How would you predict your market will be like in five years as a result of using your product and service?

This is a great opportunity to tell a story on the growth of your company. Predict or picture how your customers’ future as a result of using your product or service in five years’ time. Prove to your investors that you are able to envision and think critically about your product and how your customer will evolve over the next 5 years.

9) What if five years down the road we think you’re not the right person to continue running this company-how will you address that?

Don’t be surprised when they ask you this question. Yes, it is rude and odd but often times, particularly with high growth start-ups, funding CEO does not remain the CEO who scales the company beyond the start-ups’ phase. This is the part where you convince the investors what kind of entrepreneur you are. The reason they asked this question is that more often than not, many founders’ ego get into the way of a company’s growth and they refuse to step down for the good of the company. It is important to address this issue and prove to the investors you do not have such “quality.”

10) How much equity are you offering?

This question usually comes at the end and if it does, it should tell you that you are on the right track and your investors are interested in the deal. The investors would like to know how their shares will be allocated and how it will be diluted assuming there are future rounds of funding such as Series rounds or even IPO when your company has matured enough. A good way to answer this would be to provide data such as generating a Capitalization Table and show them how much shares and how will that change down the road. If you need help generating a Simple Capitalization Table for your pitch, fear not, check out our article on Cap Table 101.

Pitch

That should be the top 10 questions you should expect your investors to ask during your pitch. It should have covered all grounds, if not I’d love to hear from you any types of questions that aren’t covered in this article — please post them in the comments down below and don’t forget to give us a clap if you enjoy reading this article. Interested in knowing how will VC invest in 2019? Our article got you covered! Are you a startup seeking funding during Seed or Series A? Check us out here!

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About VenturX

VenturX is a web platform that helps entrepreneurs through their journey from idea to launch and beyond. VenturX uses data-driven analytics to score and connect startups and investors at Seed and Series A financing.

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How to Work on Your Startup Without a Product

Partnership

I met a great entrepreneur from Australia who was still in the midst of working on the product who taught a great lesson that I think more startups need to embrace. It was a lesson about vision, inspiration, and collaboration. This is a story about Partnerships.

Because at VenturX, we work so many technology-based startups, we often get hit with the question “How can I build more of the business when the product is not ready?” The key to any founding team is divide & conquer. When this startup came to us and was very early, they were not looking for investment or referrals or anything. Instead, they heard about us from our content via Medium, Twitter, and Facebook and wanted to form a partnership.

Here are 3 great tips:

1. The business founder should be building partnerships when the product is still undergoing development. It is never too early for those relationships.

2. When you don’t have your product ready yet, offer to help your partner first. Eg. Our new partner, intribe, offered great support via social media awareness. This was a great lesson about giving before asking. Because it is increasingly common for startups to be asking from everyone (please follow me, download this e-book, do you want me to get you more followers, etc..) It is refreshing and rare to meet those new partners who are giving before they ask. It makes them stand out. Another important aspect of this is to be realistic about how startups can give/help one another when they are small and starting out. We were given realistic expectations of what support we will be receiving via social media because it is what they could offer at the time. It yields an honest and authentic relationship right from the beginning

3. Keeping partners in the loop on your progress. Because we work with 300+ startup clients to get their financing, we do understand the pain of delays and various obstacles. When our partner schedule update calls every few months to give realistic updates and have a clear “call to action” for their partners, it is really appreciative. It shows that both sides do want to help each other and that each of their time is valuable.

Partnerships are a great way to open up your audience channels, penetrate the market quickly and co-brand. In our case, not only did this example broaden our marketing field but it also gave us an inspiring lesson to share as more startups come onto the field every day. These tips are great steps to building out those lasting relationships that can sustain through the life of your company.

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Networking in Silicon Valley

Networking in Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley

There is a stigma that people in Silicon Valley are not like anyone else. From my time living there and then going back a few years later, I learned these tips about the how to formulate a simple networking goal, what questions to ask and how to get ahead of the game! I decided to write this article because I was scratching my own itch. It was something I wished I could find more info.

Questions to ask when you meet an investor:

1) Their favourite question of mine seemed to be: “If you only one day left in San Francisco, what would you recommend?” If you feel pride and joy about your city, it is something that would bring your thought back to happy memories that you would recommend to newcomers.

2) General questions about their work: What is your investment focus, what is your average investment size, etc..

3) What are you hoping to get out of this event?

4) How is your current firm different from the last VC firm you were at? (This is a great question for those who changed firms, which does happen a lot.)

5) Offer them something instead of ask for something.

Tim Ferriss made this great video about how to ask questions. Why would this be a good source? He is from San Francisco himself and he is an elite podcaster. Podcasters are trained in their craft to do one thing — ask good questions. His key insights are:

a. Ask questions that are easy to answer. Instead of “what do you like to read?” change it to “what is the one book you give as a gift most often?”

b. Asking the right questions produces an interesting conversation. (he has a different way of saying it.)

See the full video here:

Formulate Your Networking Goal

Form my last article, “Do networking events contribute to your business goals?” I talked a bit about the importance of investing any time or money towards a networking even only if it helps you reach your business goals.

For any goal to be obtained, it had to be: measurable, timed, and accountable.

When I attended the TechCrunch event in February 2019, I had a goal of meeting X number of startups in investors in my industry. I only had 3 hours at the event. I was accountable to my friend who I will report to the following Sunday.

Even before I went to the TechCrunch event, two friends invited me to the Facebook campus for lunch earlier that day, so I was already in the mindset of achieving my goals. So, if there was any space for extra networking, I would make a new “Facebook” friend. Unfortunately, I did not have enough time at Facebook to make new friends.

How to get ahead of the game

· Add people to your LinkedIn beforehand with the note “Looking forward to meeting you the TechCrunch event tonight — Sydney, Founder of VenturX.” It is simple and short enough to fit in that introduction box LinkedIn gives. The reason for that is to get a small idea of who is attending and what their business is about (and if it relates to yours). Note: you can only do if you have newsletters or an email from the event organizer telling you who is going to be there. I received this list 2 days beforehand. (Estimated Time: 5–7 mins for 20–25 new contacts)

· Add attendees beforehand on twitter. If you are in a B2B business like VenturX, I recommend following their company twitter and check on crunchbase for the founder’s names too. (Estimated Time: 10 mins for 20–25 new contacts)

· When you get a strange request from someone you don’t know, I recommend saying hi and asking how you can bets work together. If I don’t know you and you send me a request, I will ask you that. (You can try and reference this article.)

· Thank new contacts afterwards for any tips or resources new contacts gave you. People always like to hear that their advice was helpful

· If you taking photos for company social media account as well, get there early and take photos. This is especially if your phone is slow. It takes 15+ minutes to find the wifi password, connect to wifi with my slow phone, think of hashtags, find the event hashtag, and think of my own hashtags/text, and take pictures. If you want to tag any sponsors/ people, it would take even longer.

In conclusion, networking events are great for face to face interactions so the person you are dealing with isn’t just another email to type.

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Top 3 Venture Capital Investment Trends 2019

How will VC change in 2019? I’m sure many of our readers are familiar with VC. To keep things simple, Venture capital (VC) is raising money by pitching to them your idea/project to convince them to invest in your company in exchange for your company’s equity. With an increasing number of companies going public, the VC industry continues to evolve. If you are interested in getting funded by VC and curious about how the investment trend will be like for 2019, this article is for you!

US 2018 funding

Before moving forward to 2019’s trend, let’s look backward at last year’s trend. According to a new report gathered by PwC and CB Insights, total annual funding in US 2018 increased by 30% as $99.5 billion was raised across 5536 deals.

There is no doubt VC investment shows no signs of slowing down. 2018 alone, Unicorns companies (privately held tech start-up valued at over 1 billion US dollar) were responsible for a quarter of the funding in 2018. These include new players such as Lyft, Stripe, and Slack. The trend seems quite optimistic and the following are the top 3 prominent sectors VCs are likely to invest their money in.

1. Blockchain

The global blockchain technology market is projected to be worth $20 billion by the end of 2024, according to Transparency Market Research. Many have wondered is blockchain technology the new internet? It was developed by Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008 to serve as the public transaction ledger of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin. But since then, it has evolved into something much greater. As the name indicates, blockchain is a chain of blocks contains information. The blockchain is a distributed ledger that is opened to anyone. They have an interesting property, once a data is being recorded in the blockchain, it becomes very difficult to change it.

So how does that work? The main reason why blockchain is so secure is that the way it’s developed. Each block contains a datahash and the hash of the previous block. You can compare a hash with a fingerprint, it identifies a block and its data. A hash is unique just like a fingerprint. Changing something within the block, such as data, will cause the hash to change. If the hash changes, it no longer is the same block. Given the third property of a block, hash of the previous block, if you tamper with the data of the previous block, the hash changes and in turn, this will make the subsequent blocks invalid. Hence, changing a block’s hash will consequently result in the whole blockchain being invalid.

The blockchain is also being distributed which makes it so secure. Instead of using a central entity to manage the chain, it uses P2P network, so everyone can join. Each computer, or node, has a complete copy of the ledger, so one or two nodes going down will not result in any data loss. It effectively cuts out the middle man — there is no need to engage a third-party such as banks to process a transaction. You don’t have to place your trust in a vendor or service provider when you can rely on a decentralized, immutable ledger.

2018 Blockchain Investment

In its latest report, blockchain research group Diar reports that blockchain and cryptocurrency-focused start-ups have raised nearly $7.9 billion in 2018 which approximate to nearly 8% of the total funding in 2018. Various VCs have expressed interest to fund companies that use blockchain to build their infrastructure, especially the ones that store health records and track trademarked and copyrighted licensing rights and content.

There are many exciting upcoming projects blockchain has to offer in 2019 such as Aelf, who currently raised $40 million ever since they developed an “operating system for blockchain,” which the project compares to what Linux did for computing. Using an Aelf side chain, any developer can create a customized blockchain designed for a specific purpose. In this way, the project aims to overcome the performance issues faced by other blockchains at the same time as creating a fully interoperable ecosystem. Another very promising project is by BEAMwho currently raised $25 million. BEAM is a next-generation confidential cryptocurrency based on an elegant and innovative Mimblewimble protocol. BEAM users have complete control over privacy — a user decides which information will be available and to which parties, having complete control over his personal data in accordance with his will and applicable laws. Given blockchain is decentralized, many developers are continuously finding new ways to secure privacy. Their project is intending to release enhanced functionality including atomic swaps with Bitcoin, hardware wallet integration as well as mobile wallets on iOS and Android. Privacy enthusiasts have much to get excited about.

As you can see, blockchain technology itself is likely to receive more attentionfrom the VCs this year with all these upcoming promising projects. In 2019, we will see privacy and personal data protection trends continuing to grow in importance. This is something we can expect with blockchain, given that a large part of this technology is designed to verify the identity and protect the privacy of people and assets across traditional borders.

2. Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

When it comes to AI and ML, I’m sure many of you are thinking about robots, especially on Terminators and iRobot in the movies. ML is a subset of AI, it is an application of AI that provides system the ability to automatically learn and improve from experience. The main difference between AI and ML are AI works like a computer program that does smart work, while ML is a simple concept machine takes data and learn from them.

During the past few years, a couple of factors have led to AI and ML becoming the next “big” thing: First, huge data is being created every minute. In fact, 90% of the world’s data has been generated in the past 2 years. And now thanks to advances in processing speeds, the computer can make sense of all this information quickly. Because of this, tech giants such as Google, Amazon, Apple, and VC have bought into AI and ML by infusing the market with cash and new applications. I’m sure you are aware, or more than likely already on AI tech. No? Think again. Apple Siri, Amazon Alexa, and Google Home. I’m sure these products will ring a bell. That’s right AI is so prominent that it has already infused into our daily lives.

2018 AI investment

According to a new report gathered by PwC and CB Insights, venture capital funding of AI companies soared 72% last year, hitting a record $9.3 billion, which approximate to nearly 9.3% of the total funding in 2018. Big tech giants like Google, Facebook, IBM, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, and others have put aside their doubts on AI technology and are actively embracing this new technology. As a result, entrepreneurs smell opportunities to introduce products and services based on AI in the market. In contrast to previous technology waves where Silicon Valley was the undisputed champion of start-up fund-raising, for AI-focused companies, no one location can be claimed as the nexus for investment or start-up creation.

There are many exciting projects on AI in 2019. While self-driving cars developed by Tesla is not new to most people, self-driving finance is. Based on the projects that are currently underway with banks, we can expect an increase in the number of customers that will rely on AI to drive their finances. Wells Fargo’s new predictive banking feature, powered by artificial intelligence, is one of several innovations the company is introducing to help customers seamlessly manage their financial lives and improve financial health by analyzing our banking transactions and provide tailored guidance and insights for decision making. To find out more about the top 100 AI start-ups in 2019, click here.

3. Healthcare

In recent years demand appears to be on the rise for health care products and services. What I mean by healthcare is broadly defined as everything from biotech, medical tech, healthcare, and IT services. The sector is fairly large and thus pretty attractive to both angel and venture investors.

2018 healthcare investment

According to a new report gathered by PwC and CB Insights, venture capital funding of digital health companies increased by 21.1 percent last year, hitting a record $8.6 billion, which approximate to nearly 8.6% of the total funding in 2018.

More and more VC is looking into funding biotech start-ups, especially those that leveraged on big data and biotech. According to Forbes, A common misconception of biotech investing is that early-stage companies are riskier to invest in than companies that have products in later stage clinical development. Yet many VCs actively invest in early-stage biotech because it allows them to de-risk the investment process by releasing money in smaller trances, allowing them to avoid investing larger pools of money in later stage biotech which may go toward more expensive risk areas such as regulatory, commercialization, and reimbursement. In the biotech sector, it typically takes millions of dollars to transform an innovative idea into a commercially viable product. Hence, venture capital funding is often a necessity and is critical to the success of a biotech company. The biotech industry is therefore closely linked to the venture capital industry that supports it.

Also, recent years more VCs are looking out for start-ups who incorporate AI and cognitive technologies to transform healthcare services. The true value of AI will be found in it working alongside humans to ease the pressure across the healthcare system instead of replacing current healthcare personnel due to process automation. This way, healthcare organizations can offer healthcare services more productively and effectively.

What’s Next?

From this research, we see that Blockchain, AI, and Healthcare are areas where VC will definitely lay their interest. Whatever the future may hold, emerging AI and Blockchain Technology is making indelible marks in financial markets to health care. It should be no surprise that entrepreneurial startups will be transformed by this technological tsunami and VC love transformation. If you are thinking of starting a tech startup, be ready to embrace the technological tsunami as 2019 is going to be an exciting year for you! Already a tech startup and seeking funding from VC? Check us out here!

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About VenturX

VenturX is a web platform that helps entrepreneurs through their journey from idea to launch and beyond. VenturX uses data-driven analytics to score and connect startups and investors at Seed and Series A financing.

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How to Get on the Radar of an Investor

How to Get on the Radar of an Investor

“Before you walk in the room to pitch, I should have heard about you 10 times already!” — Investor, Montreal, CA

1. Personal Connections

Just like in other industries, getting a personal recommendation from a trusted source is ideal to meet people. Historically, word of mouth is still the oldest form of marketing because there is an element of trust.

People

What can I do?

There are a few steps that you can take today to plant that seed:

  1. Let people in your network (ie. brother, colleagues, startup friends, strangers you met at networking events, etc..) know that you are working on your business and currently seeking funding. People do not know you have a need unless you let them in on what’s going on. Depending on your relationship with the other person, you are not necessarily asking for something, you are just telling them what’s going on and where you are at.
  2. Show passion for your idea. Passion is contagious and it can motivate people to help you get to that next milestone
  3. Don’t assume. You never really know who people in your network know and don’t know. During my time working with hundreds of startups, we found that many unsuccessful ones make a lot of pessimistic assumptions. They assume they don’t know anyone who can help with funding. They assume the answer to any question will be no. Just remember that if you live to 80 years old, the average person will meet 80,000 people in their lifetime.

2. Pitch Competitions

If you live in a startup-friendly place like Montreal, then you are aware of the same startups who pitch at every competition hoping to win. They may not necessarily win any competition but they are marketing themselves to the room. The mere-exposure effect is a psychological phenomenon by which people tend to develop a preference for things merely because they are familiar with them. To get on the radar and have them like you, you have to first exist in the investor’s minds.

pitch competition

What can I do?

  1. Brand new 2019 kickoff, enter at least 2–5 competitions. The business will likely change over that time but if you sign up, you are more likely to force yourself to be marketed to the investors who don’t know you.
  2. The other benefit is that you likely get asked questions from judges so investors will see how you are answering them during the Q+A portion of the pitch. It can really help you stand out.

3. Meet at Networking Events

When you go to events with speakers, booth exhibitions or casual meet and greet events, sometimes you will see who the sponsors or speakers are directly in the event description. You can see beforehand who the investors are. See the example below.

Sample Eventbrite Ticket

What can I do?

What I trained my interns to do last summer was add every single person on LinkedIn 24–48 hours before. (You don’t want to do it too early in case both parties forget.) Then, take note of the most relevant people who we should meet. Because some events might be hard to navigate with lots of activities and presentations, you want to target only 5–8 key people who are most relevant for you.

3. Execute Good Content

Online presence is also relevant. Showing yourself as a thought leader and innovator in the space will trigger the interest of the investors you are trying to attract because it shows you know your stuff.

Content

What can I do?

  1. Find out who your favorite investors are following. Find out the topics they engage with and why that is relevant for your business/space.
  2. Imitation is the highest form of flattery. Upon completing the first tip above, you will find yourself researching more and more about what interests these investors and imitate those influencers or innovators they also respect in order to get inspiration for content.
  3. Find out how they wish to consume content so you are using the right vehicles too. For example, is it written on Word, Medium or LinkedIn? Is it a video on Youtube?

4. PR / Podcasts

A great way to get some exposure to investors, partners, and clients alike is podcasts, publications, etc.. It does depend on how comfortable you are at writing, being on video, doing podcasts, etc.. VenturX has all these channels and you can see on our Youtube and Twitter/ Facebook that every single podcast we guest star in, we also repurpose the content and repost to keep engagement high. The other thing is that the more you put your brand out there, the more opportunities will come knocking on your door. In 2018, we got a call from Brahm, who was following my content and had an interest in our innovative technology. In no time, VenturX is now going to be featured in the book “Innovate Montreal.” This book will be published in 2019 and it highlights the top innovators in the major cities around the world.

Podcast

What can I do?

  1. What are the top publications and podcasters that are relevant to your industry? Reach out to them and ask how you can get on their podcast? After doing a great podcast, you may get a positive recommendation to another…and then another…

2. Create a media kit in order to save all content in one place. You can share the link to publications who ask for it, you can also use it to collect past publications you have been featured in.

3. Create a newsletter for your potential investors and partners to keep them updated about the momentum you are building and whose show you will be featured next.

5. Engage with Investors on Social Media

Social media is a powerful tool to connect with people who may not be directly in your network. You can find out which investors engaged with your posts and why. When I posted my most powerful post yet, I was surprised by the amount of positive support and engagement from investors who I met at events. The post was called “The Time I Was Threatened By a Client.” It was authentic, honest and it reached people on a human level.

Social Media

What can I do?

  1. Find out who is following you and on which mediums? (ie. Product Hunt followers, Twitter followers, Medium claps, LinkedIn comments, etc.) Then if they are an investor who you want to engage with but do not know them, add them on LinkedIn and thank them for following. Start a conversation…
  2. This method only works if you are both putting out content and engaging on social media in the first place.

6. Ask for Referrals When Rejection

Turn those “not a good fit for us” into warm introductions. Of course, this depends on the investors you are talking to.

Referrals

What can I do?

If you get an answer to your unsuccessful pitch, you can ask for feedback and if they can refer you to someone who would invest in that space or industry where it could be a better fit. If it helps, you can have an “introduction template” to send them so it makes to easier for them to introduce your company that is most representative.

7. Awards, Grants, Recognition

Investors are always looking for signs that a startup will be successful. Some startup founders may not know which things are signs of success/ momentum and how to present them.

Winners

What can I do?

  1. Advertise the awards, grants, and recognition on your website. You can create a News Page like this. This will help attract traffic to your site as well if you won a major award that others may be searching for.
  2. Keep them updated by mentioning it in your newsletter. You can also link back to the same New Page so they can see more information.
  3. Write this at your email signature that you are an award or notable grant recipient. Not enough people utilize their email signatures but you should see it as your business card.
  4. If you were a speaker at an event, it should be your LinkedIn profile cover page/facebook cover page. It should show you on stage with a microphone and the name of the conference in the background. The same goes for any pitch competition won.

8. Key Advisors on Your Board

Some startups have certain key advisors on their board in order to get attention from their specialized industries. These names hold weight and get attention. If these advisors are very invested in the startups and hold advisory shares, they have the incentive to mention them to their network/ when they go on stage for speaking engagements, etc.

Advisor

What can I do?

  1. List key advisors who would be your dream advisors to be on your board
  2. Find out which boards they currently serve on and what motivates them
  3. Reach out to them and see if some will want to work with you and bring on industry expertise and networking opportunities

9. Associate with Communities

If your startup went through an accelerator or incubator that has a strong community such as Y-Combinator and Techstar, then these communities are also good sourcing of referrals for funding. From the past years, there are also investors we have met who explained that they limit their scouting pool to only certain incubators and fund graduates from those directly for the past years. They believe in those communities or have graduated from them in the past.

techstars, y-combinator, 500 startups

What can I do?

  1. Join those accelerators if you have time and accessibility (some might require you to travel)
  2. If you do not have time, they sometimes have short 1-week boot camps or online programs you can join to also get better acquainted with their communities and offerings
  3. Find out where they hold public open events to network with those funded founders and mentors and start making connections and seeing where you fit

10. Rinse and Repeat!

Staying stuck behind a screen will not get you better acquainted with investors you are trying to familiarize yourself with. Keep repeating these steps at every opportunity and get yourself out there to set up meetings and coffees. Take advice and feedback and really listen to what they are expecting from you. Be sure to have your data room files ready (see an example HERE!)

Investors Package

We keep reminding our startup clients it is very hard to be heard through all this noise. They do not have to worry about being overly flamboyant when marketing. Startups do not have the budget to market themselves to any extreme. Even when you think you are over-doing it, that person may believe to only have heard of you once. It takes more to be remembered in someone’s mind.

Good luck!

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Entrepreneurship: Be the Boss You Wish You Had

As we go through our entrepreneurship journey, we are so focused on our day to day tasks, that next funding round, and the next milestone. When reflecting on the big picture about making a difference, we often forget how much we as people factor into each other’s lives. On average, people spend 35–40% of their entire lives at work; that is 90,000 hours. When we go back to reflect on the people we have worked for and how it influenced us in a positive and negative way, it does show up when we dive into entrepreneurship and become leaders and bosses ourselves. Because we have the ability to make great impact on those partners, employees, and colleagues we spend so much time with, we should be strongly considering being the boss we always wish we had.

Everyone’s revelations about this topic would be different. For me, I had a series of great corporate supervisors who were supportive and knowledgable. However, it was my experience at a small consulting firm that impacted what kind of leader I wanted to be or not. Here is what I learned from my former bosses.

Bosses VS Leaders

1. Do Not Oversell a Solution to Clients And Make Your Team to Underperform

As a new CEO who is starting out, there is a lot of pressure to sell in order to pay the bills. However, if you sell 20 hours worth of work for only11 hours because you are a terrible negotiator, then read this article about not giving into discounts: https://medium.com/@VenturX_team/why-startups-should-never-give-discounts-8c291ad93167 and find better clients. If your team works on a billable time basis, and you train your team to work the 20 hours, then 20 hours will still be billed and get mixed up in the finance department. The clients would file complaints against the employee or the company. The other scenario that happened is that you force some of your employees to be assigned to the bad clients and your employees are overworked and force to under-bill the clients. Your startup company would then be making less money and your employees would be constantly frustrated because they will never reach their target. They say that entrepreneurs have to learn at warp speed to succeed in business. This is a prime example as to the notable effects of an entrepreneur’s lack of negotiation and prospecting skills.

Oversell and Under Deliver

2. After the Job Offer, Do Not Propose a Lowered Salary

After accepting the job, a got a call from my future employer who suggested to go on a lower salary with an unlikely bonus system. As an employee it was my first time seeing red flags of mistrust from any employer. He did that after I turned down my other job offers in order to take this job. Entrepreneurs should never do that because it breaks trust and you get off on the wrong foot.

I have come to learn how important trust is in your team and when you get off on the wrong foot, you already tainted your own reputation.

Trust

3. Signing an Awkward Contract

When I was young and working for this firm, I did not know I could question contracts. To this day, I am not sure it was 100% legal in Quebec to make someone go on a 50% salary cut for a probation period and force them to disclose all their personal activities such as volunteering, health and wellness problems, religious activities, etc.. This was stated in our contract that I was afraid to question when signing.

What I do now, is allow all levels of employees to ask questions and even follow up if I have not heard from them. My goal is to train someone for the duration of their contract and ensure they are fulfilled and happy. I respect their personal life and I do not make them disclose details because I do not want to make them feel as uncomfortable as I felt with this previous employment. I did have one intern who requested for us to know each other more so we made it happen; Otherwise, I respect their privacy rights. I cannot guess what will make them happy, I just have to ask. I learned another great lesson that I shared on Jeremy Ryan Slate’s podcast which covers “Grown ups don’t know everything.” You can listen to it here: https://www.jeremyryanslate.com/450-growth-secrets-networking-secrets-intentional-founder-sydney-wong/

Contract

4. Do Not Change the Work Expense Policy After the Trip

On my first trip to Boston, it was clearly written that the meals for the day was $75 CAD daily. After I came back from the trip and spent a little under $75, the CFO co-founder pulled me aside to say that the change was that the meals would be now broken down to $25 per meal for a total of $75. I did not misread because that was not written in the policy they gave before the trip. Overall, this employee lost money in order to go to a mandatory work trip (to generate billable hours for this company).

What I would have done is to absorb that one time expense since the employee followed policy meticulously. Changing an important policy like that would have been announced publicly instead of being pulled aside to be shaken-down by a cofounder of the starting company.

Employer

5. Changing the Year End Bonus Structure

When the bonus structure changes as employees are getting close to the achievement mark, it is very demotivating. The original one was based on billable hours and the new one was imposed near the year end, making all my past achievements obsolete and disregarded. There was no point in starting from scratch. It seemed that the new one was put in place in order to not pay out any bonuses that year.

Today, new entrepreneurs are taught to underpromise and over deliver. When it comes to employees, it should remain the same. This rule of thumb is another element that makes or breaks trust between the parties.

6. Don’t Point Out How You Wish You Didn’t Pay Salaries to Your Employees

At the end of the year, the CFO presented our overall revenue and expenses. The awkward thing that happened was he point out the revenue was higher than he expected so “it makes [him] happy.” He also pointed out the expenses (mostly salaries) were also higher than he expected so “it makes [him] less happy and this should be lowered.” If it sounds like this cofounder is implying people should get fired, then you are right…

One good part of that presentation was that they did show the revenue for the year which makes employees feel that they were contributing to a bigger picture. It was a good graphical way to show it. Overall, I cannot see how a founder can put a chart on the big screen and tell a room of people who were overworked that he feels he has overpaid would be motivating.

Revenues and Expenses

Overall, there is a difference between bosses and leaders. Everyone makes mistakes. We can learn from the mistakes of our former bosses and try to impact others in a more positive way. As entrepreneurs, we are our own brand and we have to learn the optimal ways of conducting our businesses, ourselves, and our team as fast as possible.

Warren Buffet
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Why Startups Should Never Give Discounts

Why Startups Should Never Give Discounts

When your business is starting out, it is common to want to sell right away, rack a huge number of clients and build credibility in your industry. Building all of that takes time. What startups tend to talk about these days revolve around motivation, grinding and how well to treat to your customers. What they leave out is how not every client is good for your business, how “doing whatever it takes” may harm you in the short and long run, and how all this may affect your credibility overall.

From working with 300 startup clients, I have had the chance to see that our market is very dynamic from one client to the next. Normally, our clients are not known to have deep pockets so that is where I learned the unique lessons about discounts. A couple of key learnings have come out of that over the years that I wanted to share…

1. 80/20 Rule

20% of the people take up 80% of your time. This is a tried and true statement among many psychological situations. In business, this would be true of your clients. In a startup’s early days, it may seem like you are supposed to give discounts in order to make those initial sales and gain your credibility. However, we have seen a huge difference in those clients who will and won’t see your value. (Check out our previous article: Am I Being Paid What Am I Worth?)

For example, we had a standard fee for writing business plans as an extra add on for those looking for funding. We had a client in the past who tried to negotiate during the 11th hour when I was almost finished the business plan to demand a discount. The request was to do 3 weeks worth of work in just a few days and they did not finish preparing their research either. Because of the situation the client put us in and the hard deadline, we spent 40% of the time negotiating and 50% of the time working on the business plan (and about 10% of the time sleeping). It was a prime example of how a client took 80% of our time and it was a hard lesson to learn.

80–20 Rule

What can you do about it?

A) Walk away…

In hindsight, we did not need their business. It would not have affected our brand and our core business of helping startups get investor funding. This business plan writing was a side service that was offered.

B) Flip your 80/20 rule to benefit your business!

Applying the 80/20 Rule to Your Business

2) Beware of Acquaintances Who Try to Squeeze Your Business

As your business grows and people start to see value in what you, some people will migrate back in your life and ask for discounts to gain the benefits. One example that happened was an acquaintance of mine who needed marketing consultation because he was part of a “Co-CEO” team but neither of them was the marketing/business person. This acquaintance is someone who I haven’t seen in about 10 years and only met through school friends a couple of times. I did not know he moved back to the city a few years ago. So after agreeing on the rate and services to be provided, this acquaintance messaged me back a day later and aggressively wrote this:

“Good morning,

I’ve just checked the contract and want to point out one thing

Are you really charging me the fees the same as you charge to strangers ?”

I was not sure what this aggressive greeting was about. I eventually saw that it was his way to “ask for a friend’s discount.” I was really confused that this happened after everything was agreed upon and written up in a contract that he then refused to sign. His partner and I sorted it out later and we commenced the work. It was done in bad faith after all because the 6 month contract…got cut into a 3 month contract…got cut into a 3 week contract…

Back Stab

Back Stab

Back Stab

What can you do about it?

There are a lot of support systems in your community or even online like a Facebook group full of entrepreneurs who will give great advice based on your specific situations. I went on a Facebook live chat full of entrepreneurs because I was new to this situation and was starting out this branch of the business at the time. I went on a live video to talk to people who have walked this path. They explained that I should not consider these people to be “friends.” Also, I should go back to them and ask for more. That is what I did during the second negotiation. They only hired for 3 weeks (but it was possible that is what they intended in the first place when negotiation a 6 month contract).

Another solution is to hire a sales coach if you are new to these negotiations. If you need recommendations for sales coaches or facebook support groups, send me a message!

If startups bow down to giving discounts every time they are asked, they will only be attracted discounted clients. These small clients will take up 80% of your time. You will be spending less time doing what you love — which is providing the solution or product. Even if your product or service is superior on the market, if you act like you are worth less, than that’s how the world will treat you.

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How to Build Traction Starting from an MVP

How to Build Traction Starting from an MVP

A vision without traction is merely a hallucination. Cultivating and creating a successful startup is more than just offering a product or service, it’s a consistent effort of building, measuring, and learning. However, one of the most important factors to venture capitalists (VCs) is traction and measuring the potential success of your product. In regard to measuring traction for your startup, below is a list of what potential investors will value when looking for investments.

Minimal Viable Product

Let’s begin off with an MVP (Minimum Viable Product). This is not a beta or prototype you are launching it’s rather a product or service you make to see if there is a market for it. You are trying to learn what your users want and don’t want and minimize the amount of time you spend on creating features or aspects of the product which is not valuable. Believe it or not, many big companies we know today originated from an MVP.

Dropbox

A good example to represent this is cloud database company called “DropBox.” Their MVP product was essentially a video which showed what they wanted to do and a signup form for people who were interested in the idea and wanted to be early adopters. Almost overnight, there were over 75,000 signups all with only a 3-minute video of Dropbox and not even an actual product of the software. If you are very early in your startup, make sure there is indeed a market for your product or service using an MVP. This is a valuable aspect to present to investors if you haven’t created real customer data points yet.

Below is a list of more MVP’s which you may find very interesting and see how the actual product which has derived from this has changed.

1. Airbnb

Airbnb

Co-founders of Airbnb needed help paying their rent in San Francisco. They also noticed lots of business conferences around; hotels were very expensive in their area. They wondered if strangers would pay to live in someone else’s house for a night. They provided all the facilities and tested out their product assumption using the interface you see above. Creating a website like this especially in the type of technology we have right now would cost you couple hundred dollars max.. If you have no idea about coding then check out ShareTribe, it is great place to create a peer to peer marketplace website and they take of everything for you. You get to focus on building your customer base and they take care of everything that’s technical. Base plans start at $100 a month and this is definitely a great way to see your your product has a market fit without spending tens of thousands of dollars into something that hasn’t been validated yet. In addition to this, hiring university students in computer science is also a great cheap alternative as well.

(MVP is estimated to be $100/ month and 2–3 weeks of coding)

2.Groupon

the point

They first started off creating “the point” which was a platform for bringing people together for fundraising or boycotting a retailer. This platform failed and from this they created Groupon. They used a customized wordpress blog and didn’t invest any time in developing a coupon system or designing a new website. They just took whatever resources they had and made a MVP out of it. It definitely was not scalable but it did answer Groupon’s questions for them. To recreate this type of MVP a simple subscription to “WordPress” will work as well. Relaying information on your own customizable wordpress website is great and more importantly relatively cheap compared to investing in a dedicated server and a team maintaining the site.

3.Buffer

Buffer

What Buffer did for their MVP was create a landing page where they showed what it would do for potential users; if you were interested, you could sign up as a paying customer. If you still weren’t sure as to why you wouldn’t join, it you could still sign up for their email alerts and executives would reach out to to find out why you weren’t convinced to use the platform. Hundreds of people responded and the demand for Buffer was evident. This strategy helped give valuable feedback and find out what users really wanted out of the service. In today’s day and age creating a landing page to show potential users is very simple. The only real aspect of what is being invested is essentially your time to review and analyse what users are saying about your potential product or service.

You can use WordPress for $10–33 dollars a month and creating the static landing page will take a few days.

4.Zappos

Zappos

The founder began off by posting photos from the local shoe store and uploaded them to this website. He then checked if anyone was interested and if there was he would go to the store and buy the shoe and then sell it to the customer. Doing this overtime he found out there was indeed a need for this type of service and answered his question if his product would be accepted into the market. Only after that, he invested into infrastructure and inventory. Reselling is becoming very common in the 21st century and online commerce is almost everywhere around the world. To recreate this type of MVP it is very cheap, quick and easy. For example you can get a subscription on “Wix” for $5–10 dollars a month and use a premade template to upload photos onto your site. This process can take as little as a day. There are multiple website builders such as Wix, Shopify and SquareSpace and all with free and paid options as suited to your individual needs.

You can get this website running in 1 day and $5-$10/month on Wix

5.Twitter

Twttr

It was first used as an internal messaging system for Odeo employees and it picked up so much that the monthly bill for the messaging system went into the hundreds of dollars. They noticed the demand and prepared to take Twitter large scale and release Twitter publicly. Creating an MVP like this is more expensive than the other options available. Creating a whole messaging system for internal use requires some capital equipment which many startups may not be able to afford. However if you do have a reasonable number of assets and capital equipment then you should consider creating something for a specific group of people then expanding once you see the validation. Another way to overcome this issue is getting a developer on your team who can use today’s available tools to create a messaging system more efficiently and cheaply.

6.Zynga

Zynga

Zynga uses landing pages and adword MVP tests to direct available resources into developing projects. What this means is that they launch ads for games in existing games and if the user clicks on it and seems interested in the new game, then they would continue developing the new game and put more attention towards it. Farmville, Yoville, etc. are all games that were developed this way and based of users interests. This type of MVP is essentially placing ads whiles users are playing games or browsing through Zynga. Sending ads to your own users are virtually free but placing ads through the Google Search Engine costs about $0.58 per CPC.

Creating and launching your own ads take a few days.

7.Foursquare

Foursquare

Foursquare began with a single featured MVP which is essentially a version of the product where design and features were minimal. They started off with user check in and offering gamification rewards. Once they realized users like this they added more features and then tested those out. It was a very repetitive process but in the end it creates a product completely sculpted by users. Although it is still very pricey to outsource work in the creation of making an app as an MVP (50,000–1,000,0000) it is strongly advisable to have a experienced coder who has coded apps before. This saves on a lot of money and you make it completely customizable towards your needs. The whole app making process however takes a number of months. If you are still insistent on hiring a company to create your apps there are few who are great at that (247 Labs, Openxcell, etc.)

This MVP takes 3–4 months to build.

8.Pebble

Pebble

Pebble actually was actually able to get money from investors; however, over time, the money ran out and they needed funding to showcase their research in E Ink displays in watches. They really wanted to find out if people would be interested in a smartwatch that had an exceptional battery and could connect to your phone. They started a kickstarter which had a video explainer describing the product and reached their goal of $100,000 in 2 hours. At the end of the fundraising they had raised 10.2 million for the project and then finally they went to manufacture the product after the evident market demand. Kickstarter is a great way to really see if your product has a market fit without starting to mass produce the product. It’s free to launch on Kickstarter but there is one catch. You need to get all the funding you submitted for, if not you lose the funding you raised. In addition to this there will be a certain percentage kickstarter will take away from each successful fundraising effort. Furthermore, you need to have pictures and a live demonstration of your product in order for you to be valid for kickstarter. This whole process will take a number of days and it will be for. More specifically the Kickstarter team spends 30 hours reviewing your submission and will reply back in 2–3 business days.

If accepted, this costs $0 and 1–10 days to make the graphics/ video. (This does not include promotional campaigns.)

9.Spotify

Spotify

Spotify has a 4 step cycle when it comes to creating and testing out its MVP. “Think it, Build It, Ship it, Tweak it.” Spotify is made up of many small teams and they have many ideas, the way they get this idea validated is by first creating the MVP based off their idea. Then they release it to users very slowly and take in a mass amount of reviews from their MVP. After, they tweak the MVP based off the reviews and users’ thoughts. They used this very process to scale from bottom up. While Spotify’s MVP product was very expensive because of its strong software background, Spotify was still able to minimize costs by creating a complete roadmap of early and cheap prototypes. They only completely launched when baseline of quantity was met.

The next sign of traction I would like to focus upon is customer acquisition. How are you going to reach out to customers? What’s the cheapest way to reach them? How much customer growth have you had? Different traction channels works for a variety of startups and can cause a chain of explosive growth for your venture. A few examples of channels for traction is through targeting blogs and search engine marketing.

A) Targeting blogs is one of the most effective ways to reach out to your first wave of customers and create your presence.

  1. The first step is to find a blog which is in the similar field as your product or service and ensure there are an appropriate number of followers on that blog suited to your needs.
  2. Secondly, reach out and offer your product or service to its readership to develop and build traction. Popular startups such as Code Academy , Mint and Reddit all got their start by targeting blogs. Mint actually gained initial traction by reaching out to mid sized blogs and ensured the bloggers were a good fit for their service. The famous bloggers used to exemplify the service and showcase it while Mint gave them VIP service in return through the service. This essentially grew the customer database.
Search Engine Marketing

B) Another channel to gain traction is through “Search Engine Marketing.” This term refers to placing ads on search engines such as Google and Bing and because SEO is so broad it will be applicable to any startup. This whole SEM process works by finding high-potential keywords which leads to your website or business online. The page that a potential customer lands on is called a landing page, and this is one the most important pages on your website. Key SEM metrics to reflect upon are CTR and the CPC. CTR (Click-Through Rate) is the percentage of people who clicked on your ads compared to the amount of people who actually saw your ads. The CPC (Cost per Click) on the other hand is the amount it costs to buy a click on an advertisement. What this means is how much are you willing to pay to get a potential customer on your website.

www.ancestry.com

A good example of a company that used this method to generate traction is Inflection, this is the company behind Archives.com which was soon to be acquired by Ancestry. They spent over $100,000 a month and dedicated several employees to customer acquisition through this method. Obviously very early startups don’t have this type of resources, but Monahan’s input on SEO is that “even if you decide to send less than 5,000, do it, because you get to have an early base of customers and users and it will create a whole bunch of things that are important in terms of regular metrics.”

The harsh reality is that majority of startups fail, and investors know that, that’s why traction is very important to them and making sure there is a market for that product or service. A MVP (Minimum Viable Product is a great way to see whether or not a business opportunity exists and ensures your long run potential. There are many ways to gain traction and I have showed many examples of it from successful startups who have all taken very different routes. Ensure there is a product market fit and traction will follow. The more traction you have, the greater the chance to catch an eye of an investor and finding external investment. “Almost every failed startup has a product. What failed startups don’t have are enough customers”- Gabriel Weinberg (CEO/Founder of DuckDuckGo)

To learn more about examples of traction feel free to head on over to the article written by us on how letters of intent can increase your startup’s funding success.

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VenturX is a Startup Awards Finalist 2018!

VenturX is a Startup Awards Finalist 2018!

 

Honored that VenturX is a finalist for Startup Awards by Startup Canada

It was a beautiful night that took place at Le Gare and Ubisoft in Montreal with multiple categories recognizing the hard work and accomplishment of diverse entrepreneurs. It was truly an honour to be recognized by an incredible organization such as Startup Canada among our extraordinary peers and award recipients.

About Startup Awards

Each year, hundreds of nominations pour in from across Canada, and thousands join us as we celebrate the regional winners at local, grassroots ceremonies in startup spaces and education hubs.

Nominations for the 2018 Startup Canada Awards will open in February 2018.

The winners of the Startup Canada Awards are selected by an esteemed adjudication committee which consists of a diverse group of leading entrepreneurs, ecosystem builders, and previous Startup Canada Award recipients. Regional and National Adjudications committees to be announced.

This year, we are delighted to announce 6 regions for the 2018 Startup Canada Awards: British Columbia, Ontario, the Prairies, Quebec, the Atlantic, and the North! The Startup Canada Awards culminates in October 2018 with a red carpet Grand Finale in Ottawa celebrating the national winners. Click here to register for a regional event near you or the Grand Finale today.

Objectives of the Startup Canada Awards:

Celebrate those working to advance entrepreneurship in Canada;

  • Increase awareness of the importance of strengthening Canada’s entrepreneurship ecosystem and culture
  • Incentivize efforts and elevate the ambitions of the Canadian entrepreneurial community
  • Nominations for the 2018 Startup Canada Awards will open in February 2018.

The winners of the Startup Canada Awards are selected by an esteemed adjudication committee which consists of a diverse group of leading entrepreneurs, ecosystem builders, and previous Startup Canada Award recipients. Regional and National Adjudications committees to be announced

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