Month: March 2018

90% Trade business owners make the mistake of waiting for the “weather to warm” to begin driving for leads and estimates

90% Trade business owners make the mistake of waiting for the “weather to warm” to begin driving for leads and estimates

Guest Post by: Jeff Consul, Institute Of Innovation

This puts you into the position of a high stress April and May where everything needs to happen at once; staff training, marketing, estimating, and production. This is the worst way to try and launch a profitable year.
Instead here are the things you should be doing & thinking right now:

1. Start Marketing Now. Reboot the online ads. Pull out the signs. Hire cold callers, start flyering — begin canvasing your neighbourhoods early. Remember the first to door advantage and that people need to see your brand 3–7 times before they purchase.

2. Remember that 33% of marketing is retaining market share, 33% is getting new clients and 33% is to intimidate your competition, and always keep ’em sweating 😉

3. The big ‘secret’ that that big business’s understand is that homeowners and clients will in fact happily book months and months in advance. This allows for them to budget for a project and put money away (that they otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford!) as well as allowing them to arrange their summer plans (To be gone on holiday while a reno is going on) Earlier is always better — it allows for follow ups.

4. Connect with all of last years previous customers. Thank them for their business and if they have a corner lot — request to put up your business sign in their front yards for 2–3 weeks while you market. This create momentum for your marketers.

5. You WILL face this objection — ’But its too early!’ — The best way to handle this is, ’Actually we do the majority of our estimates while we are slow because it allows us to price things out exactly how you want it, and then gives us a timeline to plan accordingly. It also gives you the time to select colours/finishes/styles. (And we’re very busy during the summer)’
If you start marketing now you can have 50–60% of your projects booked before May 1st. Imagine how easy hiring staff would be after that.
Hope this helps!

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The Art of the Ask

The Art of the Ask

Have you ever someone say, “Well, you should have asked.” The lesson learned that those who don’t ask, don’t get. This article will tell you about top reservations why people don’t ask for things, what business opportunities can be missed, and how to structure the Art of the Ask!

The art of asking questions

The art of asking questions

The Art of the Ask could be anything such as inquiring questions to which you don’t know the answers, sharing where your company is really at and what you are looking for, asking for help, etc..The ask isn’t always a favour but it can make people feel that way.

For startups that means there are many missed opportunities over their journey because they didn’t ask; they know they could have asked; ultimately, they didn’t get the opportunity. Sometimes, these missed opportunities mean they missed meeting an investor, meeting a potential customer or learning about a new resource that would make their business more productive.

When you are running a lean startup, your main advantage is speed. Startups are all about catching opportunities at an accelerated speed! As they grow, new opportunities arise every day and it is either a gain or lost.

So then why are people so afraid of asking for things? Here are some top reasons why people don’t ask and how to master those reservations.

1. Fear of bothering or annoying others

As people, we want to be liked. So it is natural to not want to bother others. This is also a fear that the other person will say no. A simple and collaborative way to ask for help with something is to prepare to offer something in return. When we offer our expertise, services, etc., we get the opportunity to meet the needs of others. In turn, it helps limit the fear of bothering or annoying others.

For example, when our company was going through UX testing, I wanted to find a way to repay a user for going out of his way to meet us and give feedback. I found out that he was hosting an event so I knew how I could help. I lead a group of entrepreneurs within the Internations.org organization and I could help him promote his event in our community. So my promotion efforts filled up his remaining seats at his event.

2. Fear of showing your vulnerability

Sometimes an ask is indirect such as a description of how the business is going and what you need. When you express your need, you may be surprised how often others try to help. Because our clientele are startups, whenever I ask someone how business is going, the first automatic answer is “things are going really well.” This is because we are so used to saying it and so used to feeling the need to protect our “baby” (which in this case is the business). People tend to not let others in because they are afraid of any potential criticism. An easy way to perform the “tell others what your need is” would be to structure your sentence this way, “Things are going well. We just hired a new developer and we are just starting to look for funding.” It gives a realistic sense of how things are going and gives a peek about what you might need. When performing this one, just remember to keep an open mind. Don’t expect that others will suddenly know an investor to refer you to. However, when you keep an open mind, you may find opportunity in the unlikeliest of places.

Don’t be afraid to share things that you need. It takes a lot of strength to own your vulnerabilities. You would be surprised about the opportunities it open up when you share your truth. Like a child, it takes a village to build a company and startups need to grow as fast as they can. Unforeseen opportunities from unexpected sources can help you alleviate some of those “growing pains.”

3. “Oblivion is Bliss”

Oblivion

Oblivion

When we don’t ask for help or insights from others, we will be sure to stay on the same path. At the time same, we will also be sure to protect our egos. When people start companies, the market does not care about your ego; therefore, living in blissful oblivion will not help your startup in the long run. Startups need to ask, learn, and reiterate. It all starts with the ask.

When we were doing our market research when we first started, I met an entrepreneur who told me that his biggest fear was to be copied by competitors. He didn’t show me his product. It was ok. He told me that he was so afraid of being copied that he spent 3 years building it and never talked to a single potential customer. He did not want feedback and did not welcome it. It was very surprising to me that even though there were best practices on how to do product market fit and why market research was important, there are many startups who choose to build businesses their way.

Ultimately, there are always going to be new reservations about why first time entrepreneurs will not ask for things such as help, insights, and perspectives. When you do, you get the chance to uncover the possibility of the good, the bad, and the ugly from others. But here is the key thing, at least you get to uncover A POSSIBILITY that wasn’t there before! I want to leave you with a quote from my grandfather who said, “Those who ask the most questions, get the most answers.”

Asking Questions

Asking Questions

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